Daily Devotions

It might seem a little strange to read the bible and pray at your computer, in front of a screen, especially if there are other people around you, or distracting noises. But in a busy world it might be the only space available to you... and God reaches out to us, even in the most unlikely situations. So why not begin your day with a short bible reading, a reflection and a short prayer. It might make all the difference...

 

'WordLive'

WordLive is for people who want to meet with God in fresh ways and to engage with the Bible. It is created and maintained by Scripture Union.

 

 

'Our daily bread' devotional

 

My utmost for his highest

 

'Sacred Space'

'Sacred Space' is a ten minute session of prayer, with a reflection on a scripture passage chosen specially for the day...

                                      

 

The 'On-Line Labyrinth'

The 'On-line Labyrinth' is for anyone who wants a break from surfing the surface to contemplate the deeper things of life. Its maze-like path takes you on a symbolic journey, creates space to unwind and think - in particular about our relationships with ourselves, one another, our planet and God. Designed for young and old alike, it provides a mixture of rituals and visuals, contemplative words and contemporary music, symbols and media to help guide the spiritual traveller. The path has three stages - the 'inward' journey, the centre and the 'outward' journey. The theme of the 'inward' journey is letting go of things which hinder our wholeness and inner approach to God. The centre of the Labyrinth is a space of meditative prayer and peace. The theme of the 'outward' journey is relationship - with ourselves, with others and with the planet - seen in the light of our relationship with God.

                                      

Labyrinth reshapes a 12th-century ritual for the 21st century. Labyrinths were a feature of many medieval cathedrals - one of the best remaining examples is found in Chartres Cathedral in northern France. Unlike a maze they have only one path - there are no dead ends. People walk the labyrinth slowly, as an aid to contemplative prayer and reflection, as a spiritual exercise, or as a form of pilgrimage.